Hockey Goalie School: Tips & Training for Ice Hockey Goalies

 
  • 12
    February
    2014

    Goalie Parenting In Perspective

    I ended my last article "Athleticism And Development" (click here for link), with the statement, "Getting parents to heed this advice; well, that's another article." Well this is the article. Too many parents assume the role of agent and coach by maneuvering for playing time and lecturing their child on how to play the game. A player should be left to secure his or her own playing time. In the end, protecting one's child backfires because no one can be ultimately protected from competition. Parental support should be limited to paying for fees, training and equipment, emphasizing the importance of fair play and attitude, driving to and from the arena and giving moral encouragement. There are two parts to developing a player: teaching and coaching. Teaching is imparting knowledge -

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  • 08
    December
    2013

    Athleticism and Development

     Click here to view an example of athleticism (may take a few seconds to load) The majority of sports experts and countless studies argue that multi-sport participants are the best athletes (click here for the latest).  I agree and have preached forever that playing hockey twelve months a year is a detriment. Goaltending development is primarily a function of athleticism and focused practice. I can train a goalie to do all sorts of wonderful things on the ice that will improve his or her performance, as long as he or she has the athletic ability and is willing to work. Goaltending requires speed, agility, reflexes, flexibility, strength, stamina and reads. The best way to improve these athletic traits is to expose oneself to a variety of activities that will challenge one to a

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  • 28
    February
    2013

    A Parent's Role

      This blog entry is about the role of a parent in a player’s hockey career. I am a big believer that a child will excel in hockey if he or she has the passion for it. My father likes to repeat the words of the great Martina Navratilova. An interviewer asked, “For those young tennis players watching, how often should they practice?” Navratilova replied starkly, “If they have to ask then they will never be successful.” I do not believe one’s child should be pushed; the pushing must come from within. Kids will gravitate to things they like. They should be given the freedom and encouragement to do so: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=siu6JYqOZ0g In my opinion, the only thing kids should be forced to apply themselves in is school. A side advantage of h

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  • 23
    February
    2013

    LEADERSHIP IN GOAL

    I have reflected on leadership in the past, motivated by words the legendary Glenn Hall once bestowed on me: "Jon, a goalie can lead from behind."* A chance meeting with my childhood idol, Ken Dryden, a short while ago, has given me new impetus to revisit the subject. The goalie is a true leader of a team. Often, as the goaltending goes so does the fortunes of a hockey squad. Too frequently goaltenders emphasize the wrong evaluation criteria. Markers such as technical prowess and how one "felt" influence how a goalie scores his or her performance. Or perhaps he utilizes the degree of difficulty analysis when pucks find their way past him: "It was a breakaway - tough play." This train of thought demonstrates an emphasis of self over team. Yes goaltending is a game within a game; one

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  • 11
    April
    2012

    Mindset

    Mindset is the largest determining factor of success. Too many think that mistakes, goals or bad games are a reflection on ability when in fact they only gauge ability at a moment in time. A performance does not predict the future. The only thing that foretells future success is desire, willingness to learn and hard work. In 1964 Jim Marshall ran the wrong way in an NFL game resulting in a safety for the opposition ( http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0eBrb00pdGw ) It is considered by many to be the most embarrassing moment in professional sports history. He could have viewed himself a loser, a fool and a buffoon. He could have folded. Instead, he re-grouped and ended up making a tackle that led to the winning points for his team. He played until 1979 and is considered the greatest defensive

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  • 10
    April
    2012

    Perseverance

    Becoming the best goalkeeper one can be requires more than the nurturing of physical abilities; it takes strong character, mental toughness and a proper attitude. Just like technique and strength, attitude and approach are areas that can be improved. The aim of this essay is to provide an understanding of what type of mind-set is necessary for success. The story of Mike Smith demonstrates the importance of embracing proper attitude. Here is his tale: To say that Mike Smith’s minor hockey career was underwhelming is to be complimentary. Those in hockey had little confidence in his goaltending. I remember, when Mike was 17, his coach on the Kingston Voyageurs having zero faith in him. He told everybody that “Smitty” wasn’t very good.   Neverthele

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  • 09
    February
    2012

    RELAXED INTENSITY

    It is common knowledge that humans perform optimally in a relaxed state no matter what the endeavor: competing in a 100-meter sprint, a hockey game, a golf match, socializing or writing an exam. Stress makes for less happy, less healthy and less productive people. Stress cannot and should not be avoided as it propels the human race forward by providing urgency. However, it is critical to deal with stress appropriately when it occurs. Three recent experiences brought this truism to the forefront for me. The first was an encounter a few weeks back with a fellow who was promoting a new mouth guard. After putting the mouth guard into one’s mouth strength, balance and flexibility improved dramatically and instantaneously.  The explanation, which was confirmed to me by one of the

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